Thursday , September 20 2018
Home / Women Careers / Sexual harassment in the workplace still common despite #MeToo

Sexual harassment in the workplace still common despite #MeToo

The development of the Time’s Up and #MeToo movements have seen a multitude of people speak up about their experiences of sexual assault after years of silence.

But while much progress has been made in revealing the prevalence of harassment and abuse across multiple industries, there remains a long way to go.

A new study has revealed that many women still endure sexual harassment at work, and feel unable to report it for fear of losing their jobs.

Read more

Young Women’s Trust, a charity that supports women aged between 16 and 30 living in England and Wales who are on little or no pay, conducted a poll that investigated how gender discrimination still affects women in the workplace today.

Gathering responses from 4,010 participants aged between 18 and 30, the survey found that 15 per cent of the women had experienced sexual harassment at work and didn’t report it.

It revealed that a third of women don’t know how to report sexual harassment if it occurs at work and fifth state that they are too afraid to complain.

Furthermore, 24 per cent of women fear being fired if they speak openly about being a victim of sexual harassment at work.

Dr Carole Easton OBE, chief executive of Young Women’s Trust, professes that much more ne to be done to improve conditions for women in the workplace.

She proposes encouraging employers to deal with sexual harassment claims appropriately, make greater efforts to close the gender pay gap and pay closer attention to the mental health of employees.

“Sadly, even a hundred years after the first women gaining the power to vote, it’s still a rich man’s world. Young women continue to lack workplace power and spending power,” Dr Easton says.

Four female pilots discuss life on the flightdeck

1/4 Jessica Sundquist: 787 Dreamliner captain at Norwegian

Jessica Sundquist, a Swedish 787 Dreamliner captain for Norwegian, has spoken extensively about being a woman in the industry. In the past she’s spoken about the concept of “putting your femininity aside” in order to succeed.
Sundquist says today that she felt she “didn’t have to do it”, but also wanted to fit into the industry “without being known as ‘the girl’”.

Today, times are changing, she says, and more women are joining the industry – but it’s not all good news. “Despite working hard to get to where I am today as a captain at one of the most modern and exciting airlines, the industry still has a lot more work to do to give women more opportunities,” she says

In the future, she’d like the discussion on gender inequality to remain “open and ongoing”, but argues that real action also ne to take place to make any difference.

2/4 Joanna Riggs: A380 first officer at British Airways

3/4 Lucy Tardrew: Boeing 747 captain at Virgin Atlantic

Lucy Tardrew had always wanted to join the RAF, she says, but it was never allowed to happen – because ”they weren’t taking girls at the time”.

Instead, she travelled to America, where she trained before becoming a flying instructor. After returning to the UK and converting her licences, she began flying night mail – “literally all the posts around the country at night” – before stints flying executive jets, and last-minute jobs including air ambulances and freighting transplant organs, before joining Virgin 23 years ago.

Tardrew is enthusiastic about the company, but is saddened that the ratio of women in the industry as a whole remains low. As for challenges in the workplace, she’s never experienced any discrimination.
Noting the rare pay equality in the piloting industry, Tardrew feels the reason there aren’t more female pilots is down to the fact that ”there aren’t enough female role models for schoolchildren to think, ‘I’m going to become an airline pilot’.”

4/4 Kate McWilliams: captain at easyJet

1/4 Jessica Sundquist: 787 Dreamliner captain at Norwegian

Jessica Sundquist, a Swedish 787 Dreamliner captain for Norwegian, has spoken extensively about being a woman in the industry. In the past she’s spoken about the concept of “putting your femininity aside” in order to succeed.
Sundquist says today that she felt she “didn’t have to do it”, but also wanted to fit into the industry “without being known as ‘the girl’”.

Today, times are changing, she says, and more women are joining the industry – but it’s not all good news. “Despite working hard to get to where I am today as a captain at one of the most modern and exciting airlines, the industry still has a lot more work to do to give women more opportunities,” she says

In the future, she’d like the discussion on gender inequality to remain “open and ongoing”, but argues that real action also ne to take place to make any difference.

2/4 Joanna Riggs: A380 first officer at British Airways

3/4 Lucy Tardrew: Boeing 747 captain at Virgin Atlantic

Lucy Tardrew had always wanted to join the RAF, she says, but it was never allowed to happen – because ”they weren’t taking girls at the time”.

Instead, she travelled to America, where she trained before becoming a flying instructor. After returning to the UK and converting her licences, she began flying night mail – “literally all the posts around the country at night” – before stints flying executive jets, and last-minute jobs including air ambulances and freighting transplant organs, before joining Virgin 23 years ago.

Tardrew is enthusiastic about the company, but is saddened that the ratio of women in the industry as a whole remains low. As for challenges in the workplace, she’s never experienced any discrimination.
Noting the rare pay equality in the piloting industry, Tardrew feels the reason there aren’t more female pilots is down to the fact that ”there aren’t enough female role models for schoolchildren to think, ‘I’m going to become an airline pilot’.”

4/4 Kate McWilliams: captain at easyJet

“Our annual survey shows that young women’s treatment at work, pay and wellbeing are trailing far behind those of young men.

“If 2018 is to be a turning point for women’s equality and not just a footnote in history, then it’s clear that we need de, not just words.

Read more

“We need to be impatient for change: a lot has been achieved in the last 100 years but there’s still a long way to go.”

In addition to sexual harassment in the workplace, many women also still face gender discrimination when it comes to their salary, the results found.

A quarter of women aged between 25 and 30 claim that they’ve been illegally paid a lower salary than male colleagues who are in the same or a similar position at work, and a third of women state that they’ve experienced sex discrimination when applying for jobs.

Selected News