Thursday , September 20 2018
Home / Family / Doctors are putting babies’ lives at risk from meningitis and sepsis by giving parents ‘false reassurance’, report finds

Doctors are putting babies’ lives at risk from meningitis and sepsis by giving parents ‘false reassurance’, report finds

Doctors are putting babies’ lives at risk from meningitis and sepsis by giving parents ‘false reassurance‘, report findsOne parent was told that a child‘s fever was due to a change in milk formula More than 1,000 children aged under five die with sepsis in Britain every year Meningitis kills up to 150 – antibiotics can control both in the early stages  

Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent For The Daily Mail

|
Updated:
07:05 BST, 14 September 2018

Family doctors are putting babies’ lives at risk from meningitis and sepsis because they give parents ‘false reassurance‘, according to a report.

Parents are too often told their children have ‘trivial infections’ – but these can quickly become life-threatening, the Meningitis Research Foundation said.

Its report lists cases of blasé treatment, including one in which a parent was told a child‘s fever was ‘due to a change in milk formula’ and another who was told to give a baby prune juice to lower a temperature.

Family doctors are putting babies’ lives at risk from meningitis and sepsis because they give parents ‘false reassurance‘, a report says 

Commuter, 29, blasts ‘sexist’ NHS after spotting bus poster…

NHS pays £100,000 a day to compensate people who have lost…

The charity cites a study which found that in 28 per cent of cases of infant meningitis, parents were told by GPs to stay at home rather than go to AE. Rapid treatment can be the difference between life and death for sepsis and meningitis, though both are hard to diagnose in the early stages.

More than 1,000 under-fives die with sepsis in Britain every year and meningitis kills up to 150. Caught early, they can be controlled with antibiotics.

Parents were told by GPs to stay at home rather than go to AE. Rapid treatment can be the difference between life and death for sepsis and meningitis

Vinny Smith of the Meningitis Research Foundation said: ‘Parents often have a gut instinct and know when their child is seriously ill.’

The charity wants ‘safety netting’ advice – such as encouraging parents to go to AE if a fever continues to rise – to be given in every case.

Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard of the Royal College of GPs, said doctors ‘know all too well’ the dangers of meningitis and sepsis but added: ‘Initial symptoms often present in exactly the same way as common viral illnesses such as flu.’ 

‘I shudder to think what would have happened if I followed the advice…’ 

Amy Walkden fell ill when she was nine months old

Kirstie Walkden shudders to think what would have happened to her baby girl if she had taken her hospital’s advice.

Last year Mrs Walkden, 29, took her nine-month-old daughter Amy to AE after she fell ill.

‘Amy had seemed a bit out of sorts for a day or two,’ said the mental health worker from Manchester.

‘I took her to AE on the Sunday when her symptoms escalated; temperature, vomiting, mottled skin, fast breathing, lethargic.

‘However, we were sent home with antibiotics for a suspected ear infection. I was surprised but felt reassured.’ But Mrs Walkden, who is married to Chris, 38, and also mum to Dylan, five, saw her daughter’s condition worsen.

‘Back at home her temperature continued to soar and by the Tuesday she was no longer eating or drinking and I couldn’t get any normal response from her,’ she said.

Amy’s mother says her maternal instincts made her ignore medical advice and seek a second opinion

‘My instincts were screaming this was serious so I made the decision to take her back to hospital – where all hell broke loose.

‘This time the hospital were amazing and within an hour they were treating her for suspected meningitis and sepsis. The diagnosis was later confirmed as pneumococcal meningitis. We were living a nightmare and pleading for her to keep on fighting, and on day 18 she was finally well enough to come home.

‘Only time will tell what long term impact the disease has had on her, but so far she has exceeded all expectations. I shudder to think what could have happened if I’d not trusted my instincts and gone back so soon.’

 

 

 

 


Mother-of-five beautician, 31, burnt and bleached…


EXCLUSIVE: Free-loading ‘anarchist’ who hurled abuse at…


Home of British nuclear expert who appears on Russia…


‘I’m not telling you about my grandkids’: ‘Class war’…


The cottage time forgot: Eerie images reveal inside of…


The shocking moment gang member points gun in police…


Schoolgirls at mixed secondary school are reduced to…


Millennials drink less, smoke less and have less fun with…


Dementia-hit pensioner’s daughter set up CCTV in her…


EXCLUSIVE: How a father, 24, ‘went out to mow two…


Couple opening tea shop are shocked to discover they were…


Mother left in a coma after horror arson attack which…


Vile paedophile who forced an 11-year-old girl to perform…


Inside the Himalayan WIFE-SWAPPING tribe: Portraits…


Moped muggers are caught on CCTV stalking 27-year-old…


McDonald’s worker and customer fight each other in…


EXCLUSIVE: Inspirational Australian of the Year finalist…


Revealed: How British holidaymakers renewing their…

Newest

Oldest

Best rated

Worst rated

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Close

 

Close

We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.

You can choose on each post whether you would like it to be posted to Facebook. Your details from Facebook will be used to provide you with tailored content, marketing and ads in line with our Privacy Policy.

Selected News